Wyn Carr House, Western Australia

Western Australia’s first senior women’s house will house 12 women at risk of homelessness, at any one time. The previously vacant heritage-listed building, Wyn Carr House, is owned by Uniting WA.


HAA’s Western Australia Management Committee has been instrumental in securing more than $1 million in professional services, construction materials, and furnishings already donated through partnerships with over 20 individuals and private companies.


Funding of $2,537,265 has been allocated from the Social Housing Economic Recovery Package Grants Program for the construction of a modern and respectful accommodation facility. Women will have their own bedroom and ensuite, shared living areas and multi-purpose flexible-use spaces.


Uniting WA Homeless Accommodation Support Service provides intake and case management support.
Each tenant will contribute a percentage of their income towards rent and will be obliged to help upkeep the property and contribute to a positive living environment.
Building works are expected to be completed in early 2025.



“The Housing All Australians / Uniting WA collaboration came together when Robert Pradolin and I met with Uniting WA executive members two years ago and explained how we’d like to bring together purpose-led private sector organisations and businesses in our network to donate professional services, building materials and other goods and services to work with Uniting WA to repurpose un-used housing stock to provide much needed, high-quality housing for older women who are homeless or facing homelessness.

Our first project at Wyn Carr House, Fremantle, has been enormously rewarding.  We’ve been overwhelmed by the generous support offered by so many of our colleagues and peers.  Without exception, everyone we’ve approached has made a contribution, largely because they want to be part of the solution to this significant social problem and also because they can make a meaningful and tangible impact.

We are now well on our way to transforming a moth-balled 100-year-old house into a world-class facility for 12 women in need at a fraction of the cost.  It is something everyone can be proud of.”